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league in europe. combined with steadily rising television rights, they have made a solid foundation for german soccer. the only thing missing is that elusive european title. >> we hope they get it. if you are just joining us, you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we will take a look of the role of german chancellor angela merkel in solving the eurozone debt crisis. >> we will be right back. do not go away. >> welcome back. >> 2012 is coming to an end, and a lot of people in europe will be happy to see the old year out. not a day went by without worrying about the future of europe. >> not just for finance experts. a to was also a tough year for political leaders as they lurch from one crisis summit to another, spending -- spending long as wrangling over the best strategy to solve europe cozy financial crisis. >> as europe's biggest economy, germany naturally had a large say. >> as germany's leader, angela merkel naturally made sure her voice was heard. >> she's the most powerful woman in europe. all eyes were on chancellor and to merkel
crushing of eastern europe, 1944-1956." >> why do you open with a quote from churchill? >> he coined the expression iron curtain. it was such an evocative escription of what happened, when he gave the speech that i thought it was important to put that the beginning of the book. >> did you ever think of what he called that the iron curtain? >> there is a long story. it is a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the questi
and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did
in europe are trading lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the fed takes the new and surprising step in its ongoing efforts to boost the economy, tying interest rates directly to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors cheering the plan to save danone's plans to offset losses over the next two years. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> welcome to the program. coming up on today's show, we'll be plenty busy. we head out to tokyo where carry enjoji has been talking about the upcoming elections. then, we hone in on central london where one pilot project is living roof and major buildings. find out what green living can do go r to improve the area. >>> and today, the 1 billionth international tourist will reportedly arrive at a destination in the world. at 11:20 central time, we'll speak to the world travel council to find out why france is still the world's top destination but more money is spent in the u.s. and c
's take a look at how markets are trading. stoxx europe 600 is down about .6% this morning, this after word that house speaker john boehner's plan b didn't come to a vote last night. he couldn't get them in place apparently. we'll have plenty more on the impact of that on the program. not much here, we see decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so
weighing on investor sentiment today. in europe, it was the last trading day of the year, and what a year it has been. our correspondent has kept an eye on the trading floor all year for us. he sent us this report from the floor of the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the year has ended a very successful 2012, also for the frankfurt exchange, which is why you see tables and chairs where there usually are not. there will be a celebration here shortly, and there is something to celebrate -- the dax performed to the tune of about 30%-plus this year, and many shares went up. only a few lag behind. the best shares almost doubled in value. when you look at the second tier, there were some that more than doubled in value. demand mostly responsible for that, according to -- the man most responsible for that according to everyone here is mario draghi. he promised the european central bank would do everything in its power to preserve the euro, and that really release energy and restored some confidence also for the bureau. in 2013, people see more share market. the dax could reach a new record highs. p
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
, mild, 24 degrees there in houston. now, let's look over towards europe. first i want to talk about this storm system here in eastern europe ar europe around the balkans. you saw 65 kilometer per hour winds today. this is due to the strong system moving off towards turkey, but still bringing with it gusty winds and heavy rains and even destructive winds possible at this time. don't be surprised if we see a report of a tornado out of this one. il it's just a very severe storm system. farther to the west into the british isles with clear skies. going into the afternoon we have another storm system off the atlantic. that's going to bring is all sorts windy and rainy conditions. really dampen down on here on wednesday into thursday as that system continues to push onshore. from the south warm air surges ahead of it. madrid there with a high of 13. london and paris at 7 and 8, not so much the case farther towards the east, though. moscow's high is minus 16 for your high on your wednesday. here's a look at your extended forecast. >>> we'll be back in 30 minutes with more news. i'm gene ot
rea. >> hillary clinton earlier this month. it is believed it was while on her trip to europe that the u.s. secretary of state contracted a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. on her return home, she collapsed and severed a concussion. during a follow-up examination, doctors have discovered a blood clot. mrs. clinton is being kept under observation in this bill york hospital, receiving medication, and will remain here for the next 48 hours at least. she has been offered for the past three weeks. her illness prevented her from testifying before congress about the attack on u.s. diplomatic mission in benghazi. that killed the ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans. the department faced severe criticism. mrs. clinton who is the most traveled secretary of state in u.s. history is due to step down in the new year. many democrats want her to run for the presidency in 2016. her health is likely to be a major factory in making any decision. >> concerned about the health of the venezuelan president hugo chÁvez, suffering of further complications after ca
. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous, unstable, violent and anti-american than before. let's take a look at facts. in the 1980s the newly empowered radical islamic republic of iran unsettled the region with its promise to spread its revolution elsewhere. lebanon was in the midst of a bloody civil war. that engulfed itself and the palestinians and israel. iran and iraq fought a gruesome war with over one million casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced well arms regimes. leading members of the rejection
the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in the fall and winter with one of their daughters and a chauffeur and a paid companion. so pretty much, they lived separate lives after about 1880. c-span: did they ever divorce? >> guest: no. divorce was really not an option in that world. some people did, but it was very scandalous and shocking. and interestingly enough, it was always--the women were--it was more disruptive for the woman. women were objects of scandal, even if they had done nothing wrong. and a couple of the people the morgans knew who d--women who did get divorced, moved to europe, just because it was a much more accepting, forgiving society. and also, i think, in professional terms, morgan was a conservative banker with a reputation for integrity. divorce didn't figure into that picture. c-span: this picture right here is of which woman
normally on boosting growth. >>> well, it's been a rel ofly good year for stocks in europe. adding about .3%. advancers mostly outpacing decliners on the index this morning. if we can zero in on the bourses, it's largely green behind me. the fits fits mib is atting .6%. the ibex in spain, up 0.8%. and the ftse up about 0.3%. now, some company-specific news this morning, fin mechanica saying shares up 2.4%. this on news they're set to buy sge-avio. safran is also a company considering that change. let's take a quick look at the bond space. we'll get a sense of the kind of trade we're seeing shaping up. it is consistent with flows into the periphery, perhaps out of the core and the risk on move generally that we're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit of movemen
you will have your own views on that one. as a euro crisis crimes on, people all over europe are looking for safer ways to invest their money. in many countries, they believe the answer lies in property. property prices on many big cities are still booming, and that means there is a shortage of affordable housing for students or low-income families. people being priced out of a home has become a major problem in hamburg in germany with many people forced to live with relatives or to commute long distances to work or study in the city center. the challenge now is for the authorities to provide new, cheaper housing, but, of course, finding they could building plots in a city is not always easy to do. dan hamburg's knew of market city district has become a tourist attraction. hamburg is a rich city, and it is becoming less and less affordable for average earners. many here live a shadowy existence, on the go all day with no place of their own, spending nights on the sofa us of friends. lena is studying political science at the university of hamburg. she is not registered, so we
to market internationally in the way that moore really seemed to fit with the modern movement across europe and the world. so an agency like the british council, looking to promote british culture and a new view of britain as a great power but coming to terms with the aftermath of the second world war, would listen to these voices telling them that moore is the great artist around at the moment. (narrator) that international stature permitted moore to work on a larger scale, a dream since the early '30s. he could now afford to hire assistants, including anthony caro, who would go on to a successful career of his own, with works like the national gallery ledge piece, installed in 1978. i thought he was the most interesting sculptor around. and really, i went to ask him if i could work with him, work for him, because i'd had too traditional a studentship. a studentship, really, where we were taught by people who thought that art was about nymphs and fawns and generals on horses and that. i used to drive him into london from much hadham and we'd talk about art. we'd have little conversations a
data showing the private sector has expanded for the first time since april and signaling europe could avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it's a five-month high. the manufacturing pmi, 46.1. the manufacturing all told, 46.3. that's a bit under the poll of 46.6. with more on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it
for the high. it's going to be chilly, winnipeg at minus 10. and let's look over towards europe in the british isles, cloud cover towards western europe. that is a very strong and deep low pressure system and the threat with this one as it pushes in, won't just bring heavy rain showers but strong high pressure down towards the south keeping things dry in the iberian peninsula and interacting creating lines close together, a tight pressure gradient, up to 120 kilometers per hour especially along the west coast of the u.k. and towards ireland, that's continuing to push to the northeast. it's going to be raising up temperatures. we'll see rain in the scandanavian peninsula and the threat there is snow melt and avalanche. farther towards the south, things will be remaining on the dry side. you'll see temperatures near the freezing mark towards vienna. 2 degrees for the high. london and paris, as warm air pulls in, you're seeing above average temperatures. london and paris 11 and 13 on your saturday. madrid, up to 11 degrees. let's look over towards eastern asia into japan. starting to bring heavy
risk factors related to u.s. and china and europe. and fiscal cliff issue in the u.s. is one of top concerns. that's, i think, just a matter of time. obama administration will be able to overcome the difficulty of this situation sooner or later. so i don't care about it. and regarding china, china economic trend is another big concern. but, we think china has already achieved soft landing. >> so he's optimistic about those risk factors and he expects the nikkei to hit 13,000 by this time next year. so we'll keep you updated on the markets as we move into 2013. >>> for most investors this is also the last trading day in currencies in tokyo. the dollar continues to gain strength against the yen. $buying intensified during the day sending the u.s. currency above the 76 yen level. dollar changed hands at its highest levels in two years and five months. it's now nearly ten yen higher than at the beginning of this year. the yen has been losing strength since october. that's because the market speculation, the bank of japan would take further monetary easing measures. the yen came under pr
at what's been happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but ther
idea what he was saying. turner traveled throughout britain and europe. often on foot, carrying a paintbox, he sketched and painted lyrically beautiful landscapes that changed the face of british art. when he died in 1851, he was one of the wealthiest and most famous artists in britain's history. throughout his career, he was always well aware of the key to his success. (reader) "the only secret i have got is damned hard work." (narrator) turner's life and career began in london. by 1788, at the age of 14, j.m.w. turner was apprenticed to an architect as a draftsman. architectural views appeared in his works throughout his life. the next year, turner entered the royal academy of arts school at somerset house. its president, the painter joshua reynolds, endorsed the prevailing view that ranked paintings in a clearly defined hierarchy. history painting was considered the noblest because it could portray events drawn from historical incidents, literature, the bible and mythology. genre painting, scenes from daily life, came next because they also offered examples of virtue to inspi
's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is itaiis on for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k. compared to many western economies,
century, beginning of the 14th century, venice is one of the biggest cities in europe, one of the biggest and richest and that's kind of remarkable because if you've ever been there, it's such a crummy place. rd, mosquito bitten, lagoons, very hard to build are the only reason italians ended up babies because they chased them off the good land. so yours is incredibly rich, incredibly powerful state, sending its trade mission to china, controlling creeks, lands along the croatian coast, controlling my inspiring to the italian and land. how did they do it? to the nations of this fabulous right we can still taste today, where the liquor in her to probably the most innovative and economic system at that time. they have a particular form of contract system, which allowed. unusually if you were a person willing to take on risk. even if you didn't have capital, you could share in a deal with the partner who did have capital: a trading nation in the guy who didn't have capital, but he raced his life took a share of the profits. this really was the reason you have this huge market title vicar and
. >> which might be a slightly better outturn. china seems to be back on track. is there anything in europe -- what's the tail risk at the moment? >> i think there's two things that could still go wrong in europe. one, there's always political risk. in italy, you do have elections coming up. there's a chance getting a higher share than people anticipate. but even then, the financial forces are going to force any government that comes into power to more or less stick to the plan morsi set out. on the other hand, there's always spain, the worries that with 25% unemployment, that you would see the default rate particularly on residential mortgages shoot up, it's 3% now, which is pretty amazing given the struggles within the economy, but we think it will go up somewhat, but really not any more than people have already priced in. >> and then ten year yields, 5.24%. at the moment, relatively speaking, pretty comfortable. >> maybe a little bit too comfortable and we certainly don't want to get complace complacent.yields are where they were say in march of this year and then subsequently they shot
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
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kinds of europe stuff. all anybody wants is fiscal cliff resolution. >> did the fed spook anybody yesterday? >> no, i don't think so. i really think what sold off yesterday is people were just concerned about the fiscal cliff again. the fed didn't really do anything. they put kindleing on the fire, if we get a fiscal cliff, there's an awful lot of money out there to get this market going. >> it just strikes me that a central bank now $85 billion new dollars per month into the financial system and buying treasuries to hold rates down, they're not going to let rates go up any. i just intuit that. >> no. there was some talk that perhaps what they signaled was higher rates sooner than 2015 and i think that's absolutely wrong. there's no way. this was an easing policy. they're putting more money into the system. they're not going to let rates go up any sooner than they need to. after most recession, they don't really raise rates until 18 months after. so i think 2017 is probably your number. >> 2017. all right. let me just ask you about some other stuff. japan rising. europe stocks doi
means i.c.e. will be clearing its equity trades in europe. this deal will not face regulatory scrutiny with the way that this is formed. the former deal attempts with deutsche boerse fell and here there was no overlap between i.c.e. and nyc. however, this clearing agreement makes it very tough and expensive to break up this deal between nyc and i.c.e., so the question market sources are asking now is what is the next move for cme group, nasdaq, hong kong exchange, among others? let's talk about when,deal and what it all means right now. scott, this is part of the deal that's really being underreported and not spoken about too much. that's the clearing exchange partnership. that's going to make it very tough to penetrate and to get any competitors to break up this deal. >> officials all over the globe who are assessing this deal and trying to figure out what they are going to do next to try to remain competitive. joining us now are david faber, bob pisani and steven guilfoyle and rick santelli at the cme. first, david, who broke the story this morning, i guess this deal had to happen ba
of the former brish colonies. in europe the dax down about there about 35 points, around half a percent. and overnight in japan, the nikkei, the yen falling to a 20-month low. you have the nikkei up 1.5%. the nikkei -- yen versus the dollar as shinzo abe returns to office as japan's new prime minister, promising monetary and fiscal reforms. we have the shanghai composite there up about a quarter percent. >>> all right. in today's top stories, the u.s. is five days away from going over the fiscal cliff. president obama is cutting his holiday vacation short, returning to washington tomorrow to continue talks to try to avoid that automatic tax hike and spending cut combination. that's the same day that congress returns to town. before the president left town on friday, he suggested a stopgap measure to freeze tax rates for people making less than $250,000 a year and extend unemployment benefits. reports say white house staffers have been quietly working with senate democrats to come up with a plan to avoid the fiscal cliff, but little progress has been made. >>> a chinese ratings agency is
and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 europe was booming minks were giving easy money at low interest rate and prices were rising and they were buying the bonds because they pay high interest rates. but the prices are so high they reached a level where nobody could afford them they could not buy the bonds of day with some of them. 80 percent was on by the europeans. then they went into bankruptcy and the bank had to close. know more customers for the railroad bond edberg and hetty had to come back to america. this city had burgeoned with tense story buildings central part stretch north and a brownstone houses replaced the shanties and apartment houses appeared for the first time. the largest bookstore in the world, patrick's touched this guy the metropolitan museum of art opened in the museum of natural history. the exuberant spending was no different from the unfettered expansion from industrial on to procurers, promoters and real estate speculators. from 1873 the financial panic flat and the country into despair. does that sound familiar? and the stocks bounced up and down.
snowfall has blanketed much of europe the snow has already caused a few headaches. flights have been canceled and delayed in cities such as paris and amsterdam. last weekend, heavy snow in russia shut down a major highway leaving drivers stranded. europe has more snow in the forecast. i was just in washington d.c. it was blue skies. and a sunny skies. >> it is still december. >> and time flies when you're having fun. >> it is going to be gorgeous with temperatures in the 60s. 63 degrees in san francisco, san jose. fremont. mid-60s, concord. and we do have some rainfall on the way but we will wait a little bit with light rain. with much cooler expected. >> perfect for the season. >> correct. >> that is it for us will see you at 11 (music)
. >> that we're just relieved, and that you don't get the huge bounce. but europe is also tracking what we're doing here. as it should really. our economy is much more important to the globe than what happens in any of those little economies over there. the shares drifting higher in early trading on expectations that a budget deal is closer. in asia, japan's nikkei rising above the 10,000 mark, wow, the first time in more than eight months. still a ways from 50,000. among the catalysts, expectations of more aggressive monetary stimulus from the bank of japan. the boj wraps up a two-day meeting with a policy announcement tomorrow. >>> the world bank in the meantime is raising its 2013 economic growth forecast for china and for developing east asia. the organization says that the region remains resilient despite the lackluster performance of the global economy. the world bank sees china expanding by 8.4% next year. it's expecting that it will be fueled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. today's forecast is higher than an earlier one that was sited
of consultation in the international regulators, canada, australia, japan, europe etc. and we continue to work the issue. i would say with banks registering the largest banks registered in the term, we are going to have more issues to sort through and we are committed to soaring through -- >> you are not talking of those that registered when you are making that statement. just the firms that register. >> but i have some expressions from some of the foreign regulators that they feel like some of the guidance may be in conflict with their loan regulator, their own that regulation and i guess that is what i am saying. if they are in conflict how are you dealing with those conflicts? >> the one example was in japan they have a clearing requirement. they actually put in place november 1st and we now have a requirement that we finished in november. there is a conflict because we both say they have to be cleared and registered clearinghouses. yet they have yet to register the london clearing house and we have yet to register the japanese clearing house. we are relieved they can use the japanese clear
. didn't raise the maximum amount. that's where we stand. it's another cautious day under way in europe. back to you guys. >> might get my haircut like hers, ross. you know, that anna wintour. that bizarre -- do you think you can manage it? >> a page boy. >> you think you carry that one? >> you'd look awful. >> you know what? we're going to do it. >> you're asking these guys to put me -- >> you'd look good in that one from "dumb & dumber." >> yeah. i make that sound. the most annoying -- you want me to do that? >> no, we don't. >> morgan stanley is trying to bolster lending. some advisers are said to have left the firm due to a lack of lending capacity. you didn't bargain for this, did you? we're asking you about your company. is that okay? >> absolutely. >> greg funding -- we already know he joins us. you did provide investors with an update. >> yes. >> ross, you want to get into this conversation as well? you hear him? >> he's gone. >> he's gone now. our audio guy is drinking or something. what did you tell them? >> i told them that we have a great business in wealth management. we've
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
, a message of hope to occupied europe and of course in 1940 and 1941 an a meal for great support for the united states. >> give us the tool and we will finish the job. >> one of my favorite documents within the exhi business, churchill was in new york in december 1931. and was knocked down by a motorcar on fifth avenue at 76th street. and it was the classic mistake of the brit in america and he got out of his taxic-- taxi, looked the wrong way and was immediately hit by a car going the other direction. what he did was two things. he wrote an article on what it was like to be hit by a motorcar. but he also managed to persuade his doctor in prohibition era new york to write him a prescription necessitating the use of alcohol at all meals. >> rose: joining me now is celia sandys, winston churchill's granddaughter, david reynold-- renolds of cambridge university, peter clarke on the recently published mr. churchill's profession and i am pleased to have all of them here at this table. thank you. >> rose: i so looked forward to this i was go-going to tell a story that i once went to se
of europe i suppose, in the 1880s. do you favor any particular moments of those? maybe it was in the crimea. i mean, i've always thought of this as being sort of ottoman. well... i think one of those things is right... ...but i don't think the crimea is the one. right. i think i'll favor the low countries, or certainly the european grand tour. it's much more likely this piece here didn't start out life in this frame, so i think what we've got is probably a 19th-century frame. do you have any clue how old this might be? maybe 17th century. i don't know. i think it's rather earlier than that, actually, for various reasons. i think it's been put into this frame probably in the 1880s. would that sort of fit with the dates that they were traveling around europe? yes, they were traveling 1870s onwards, yes. so i suspect that someone has put it together to sell to a northern european traveler as a treasure to take home. not a fake of the day. not a fake of the day. no, in fact, i'm sure it's not a fake of the day and i think perhaps we'll move on to why. firstly, i think it
. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what is holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can breakthrough the logjam and go ahead and get things done? and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got even a lot of briefings, let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect
are the afghans. the united states ended in western europe have no interest in occupying and colonizing afghanistan into the 51st state, or whatever. the afghans are there tuesday. the others come and go. -- are there to stay. the others come and go. >> puc much fighting? gregg's my time was split between the capital -- >> my time was split between the south. endand the >> you know afghanistan well. thank you for coming in. it has been over a month now since a americans gave president obama four more years in the white house. there are now more minority voters than ever before. and in large part, the republican candidate lost because he failed to reach out to them. if your than one in three latino's failed to vote -- fewer than one in three latino's failed to vote for mitt romney. what will the republican party need to do to get the hispanic vote? >> at a christmas party outside of boston, republicans are not feeling particularly festive -- outside of austin, republicans are not filling a particularly festive. they know they have a challenge in front of them. within two years, hispanics
a session low, 0.4% as problems in europe's periphery continue to weigh. a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake has struck across japan's northeastern coast. the quake rocked buildings as far as tokyo according to reports. u.s. geological survey said there was no threat in the wider pacific ocean. the yen has been rising to a session high before we got details of that. and right now, you can see dollar-yen at 82.39. 82.17 before that happened. some safe haven in-flows into japanese currency. if there was going to be a wave in terms of tsunami that was going to hit, it would have happened around five, six minutes ago and she had yet to see any specific drop or change in the sea level. so we'll hope that that continues on that particular way. atomic power says no irregularities seen at its nuclear plant. operations are normal after the quake. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and we'll see if there's any further reaction, as well. hurricane sandy is expected to have put a big department in the jobs report out at 8:30. expected to rise by just 80,000. it would be the smallest job growth in five mont
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